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66th Anniversary of the nuclear bomb on Hiroshima

66th Anniversary of the nuclear bomb on Hiroshima

The 6th of August is the anniversary of the bomb dropped on Hiroshima.  In Japan an International Symposium of Anti-nuclear activists has taken place and their declaration which World without Wars and Violence totally supports is copied below.

2011 World Conference against A & H Bombs

Declaration of the International Meeting

In the 66th summer since the U.S. dropped atomic bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, we renew our call on the world to take action to achieve a “nuclear weapon-free, peaceful and just world.”
The earthquake and tsunami that hit eastern Japan last March took the lives of more than 20,000 people and inflicted catastrophic damage over extensive areas.  The highest level nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant followed it.  We offer all the victims our deepest sympathy and condolences.  We extend our best wishes and solidarity to the people engaged in post-disaster rehabilitation and reconstruction, and in the effort to bring the nuclear crisis under control and protect the lives of people from radiation exposure.

As the call for a total ban and elimination of nuclear weapons is being shared by broader sections of people, including citizens, municipalities and national governments throughout the world, the question how to achieve a “nuclear weapon-free world” comes into sharp focus.
The Final Document agreed upon at the 2010 NPT Review Conference resolved to achieve a “nuclear weapon-free world,” and called for a special effort to reach that goal.  The 65th Session of the U.N. General Assembly, last year, adopted by an overwhelming majority a resolution calling for a nuclear weapons convention.  The Non-Aligned Movement proposes an international conference to discuss ways and means to eliminate nuclear weapons.  Many international organizations such as the Mayors for Peace have started serious work on a nuclear weapons convention as an important step towards the abolition of nuclear weapons.
We have been working around the world to urge the nuclear powers and all other governments to start negotiations for a nuclear weapons convention.  To date, the signature campaign for the “Appeal for a Total Ban on Nuclear Weapons” and many varieties of other initiatives are under way, supported by a broad range of people.  By further developing these actions in cooperation with the U.N. and many national governments, let negotiations for the nuclear weapons convention begin immediately and be completed without delay.
 
Although the agreements reached to date should have been duly implemented, no significant progress has been made.  Countries with nuclear weapons are particularly to be held accountable for this stalemate.  The repeated subcritical nuclear tests conducted by the U.S. Obama Administration contradict its own pledge, as well as the spirit of these international agreements. 
As long as “nuclear deterrence” policy persists, “peace and security in a nuclear weapon-free world” cannot be achieved.  Instead it provides incentives to acquire nuclear weapons to counter that policy and causes nuclear proliferation.  The paradox and danger of this policy is clear.  We reiterate our demand for a clean break from “nuclear deterrence” policy by all nations.
While calling for the start of negotiations for a nuclear weapons convention, we demand a ban on the use of nuclear arms, the withdrawal of such weapons deployed on foreign soil, the prohibition of the bringing-in and deployment of nuclear weapons in other countries, and the creation of more nuclear-free zones. 
We demand the de-alerting of deployed nuclear weapons, further reduction and dismantling of strategic weapons, elimination of tactical nuclear arms, cancellation of modernization and new development of nuclear weapons, and of the Missile Defense programs.
The early ratification and entry into force of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, the immediate start of negotiations and conclusion of a fissile material cut-off treaty, and convening of an international conference in 2012 to establish a nuclear weapon-free zone in the Middle East should all be implemented, as agreed upon in the NPT Review Conferences.
The issue of North Korea’s nuclear program should be resolved peacefully through dialogue by restarting the Six-Party Talks. 

As the movement that originates from the tragedies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and calls for the abolition of nuclear weapons, we are deeply concerned about the severity and scope of radioactive contamination and damage caused by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.  It revealed the deceit of the “safety myth” and the danger of nuclear power plants.  It is possible to secure energy sources for sustainable development without recourse to nuclear power and without leaving a dangerous burden to future generations.  Let us develop solidarity with the movements in Japan and the rest of the world demanding the decommissioning of nuclear energy and a shift to renewable energy sources.
Japan’s peace movement demands that, as the A-bombed country, its government should play due role in concluding a nuclear weapons convention.  It also demands the abrogation of the secret agreements with the U.S., which allow nuclear weapons to be brought into Japan, as well as the strict observance of the Three Non-Nuclear Principles.  It calls for the dismantling of U.S. military bases in Japan, including the U.S. Marine Corps Futenma Air Station in Okinawa, and opposes the deployment and port-calls of nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and other warships.  We express our support to the Japanese peace movement in its effort for Japan to break away from the U.S. nuclear umbrella and achieve a nuclear-free Japan, and to defend and honor Article 9 of the Constitution of Japan.

Although wars and gunfire continue in different parts of the world, it is no longer time for major powers to prevail in the world by military force.  Opposing the threat or use of force, we demand that conflicts be settled through diplomatic and peaceful means.  We support a world order of peace based on the U.N. Charter, as opposed to military alliances against imaginary enemies.
We extend our warm solidarity to the peoples in North African and Arab countries who stand for freedom, democracy and human dignity.  We demand the cessation of NATO's attack on Libya and a ceasefire, and a political solution of the issue.
We oppose the occupation of Iraq and the military operations in Afghanistan and demand the withdrawal of all foreign military forces.  Our support goes also to the struggle for the right of the Palestinians to national self-determination, including the right to establish an independent state.  We oppose foreign military bases, and stand in solidarity with the movements for the defense of the national sovereignty and for the removal of such bases.  We work in solidarity with the movements for relief from war damage, including the victims of Agent Orange.

We call on the people of the world to take the following actions:
  - To develop many forms of international, regional and national actions to press for the start of negotiations on a nuclear weapons convention, including the signature campaign for the “Appeal for a Total Ban on Nuclear Weapons,” and present the achievements of these initiatives to the U.N. General Assemblies and in the next review process of the NPT.
- To strengthen the movement in each country and region for the removal of nuclear arms and for nuclear-free zones, and develop campaigns and public support for the overcoming of the “nuclear deterrence” policies.
- To strengthen our activities for the relief, solidarity and support of the Hibakusha of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and all nuclear test and radiation victims, to root out any more damage and suffering from radiation.  Noting the link between nuclear weapons and nuclear power generation, we oppose military use of nuclear technology and demand an end to the reliance on nuclear energy and a shift to renewable energy sources, and we will work in firm solidarity with the broad range of movements.

The achievement of a “nuclear weapon-free, peaceful and just world” is the common desire of all who work for peace and against war.  It is shared by many people who strive for democracy; human rights; protection of the global environment; women’s rights and status; resolution of such issues as hunger, poverty, unemployment, illiteracy and injustice; and for a drastic reduction of military expenditure and armaments and improved social welfare.  To achieve this shared goal and to open a new era, let us take bold steps forward, together with the Hibakusha and with young people, who bear the future of humanity.

August 5, 2011
International Meeting
2011 World Conference against A & H Bombs
 

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